Sensory Motor Adaptive Rehabilitation Technology (SMART) Network
Sensory Motor Adaptive Rehabilitation Technology (SMART) Network

Develop innovative medical devices and rehabilitative interventions for people with neural injuries and diseases such as spinal cord injury, stroke and multiple sclerosis.

5005B Katz Group Centre
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1

780-492-1672

vivian.mushahwar@ualberta.ca
www.smartneuralprostheses.med.ualberta.ca

Sensory Motor Adaptive Rehabilitation Technology (SMART) Network

SMART Network

Vivian Mushahwar, Director SMART Network Innovation Centre


Health Innovation

Headquartered at the University of Alberta, the SMART Network has brought together more than 90 researchers from different fields into one lab to develop innovative medical devices and rehabilitative interventions for people with neural injuries and diseases such as spinal cord injury, stroke and multiple sclerosis.

How they are changing the world

Experts from the fields of neuroscience, biology, engineering, computing, neurosurgery and rehabilitation are putting their heads together to come up with creative solutions to improve quality of life and functionality for people with neural injuries and diseases. This collaboration is unlocking the mysteries that still surround how the nervous system, brain and spinal cord work when damaged, and creating intelligent medical devices and rehabilitation interventions for improving the abilities and life experiences of people with disabilities.

Why Edmonton?

There is a rich history of interdisciplinary research at the UofA that dates back to the 1960s. However, with rapidly developing technologies, there was a push to create the SMART Network and bring research minds in this important research area together under one umbrella with shared resources and expertise.

What does the future look like?

Several ground-breaking innovations are in the works, including a micro-implant in the spinal cord to restore the ability to stand and walk after paralysis, a prosthetic arm that moves and feels like a natural arm, a smart electronic underwear (Smart-e-Pants) to reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcers, a bionic sock (The Sock) to prevent blood clots in the legs, and holographic telehealth projecting medical experts to remote areas to advise in diagnosis and administration of care to patients.

“There are no limits to what we can achieve together. The limits are our own imagination.”